NW HCS Trainee Network Board

Co-chairs

HelenHelen Beeston
helen.beeston@cmft.nhs.uk
STP Trainee (started 2015)
Specialism: Clinical Biochemistry
Central Manchester University Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust
Background
I graduated with a BSc in Biochemistry from the University of York.  I then went on to complete my PhD at the University of Leeds where I applied mass spectrometry to investigate protein structure.  In September 2015 I started the Clinical Biochemistry STP at Manchester Royal Infirmary.  I enjoy working in an environment where I can use my scientific training to directly benefit patients.
Job role
Clinical Biochemistry is the study of biological or chemical mechanisms in the body relating to disease.  The results from these tests will influence how a doctor treats their patient.  A Clinical Biochemist is on-hand to give advice, interpret biochemical results, as well as being responsible for ensuring the quality of the results authorised by the laboratory.  They are often involved in research projects to develop new assays.

Jamie
Jamie Osborne
james.osborne@boltonft.nhs.uk
STP Trainee (started 2016)
Specialism: Clinical Biochemistry
Bolton NHS Foundation Trust 

Background
I discovered clinical science whilst studying for my BSc in Biomedical Science at Keele University.  Thanks to the help of my lecturers there, I was able to get work experience in hospital laboratories in the West Midlands where I found that it was the perfect combination of science and healthcare for me.  I applied for a place on the STP in my final year of university, was lucky enough to get a place and am now a Trainee Biochemist based in Bolton.

Job role
Biochemistry, alongside Haematology, makes up much of the ‘bread and butter’ work of a hospital laboratory, with a huge number of blood tests ranging from the most basic (e.g. sodium) to highly specific cancer markers.  A Biochemist interprets test results, introduces new and improved tests into the laboratory repertoire and liaises with clinicians in order to develop our service in a way which benefits the patient most.

As a trainee biochemist, (when I’m not studying) much of my time is spent on research projects centred around new tests and ways of bringing a laboratory service to those who do not access the NHS in a normal way.  There’s a lot to learn, but I’m loving the level of involvement I get whilst in the laboratory at Bolton and I’m looking forward to more as I progress through the course.

PTP Members

AdamWorthingtonAdam Worthington
adam.l.worthington@stu.mmu.ac.uk
PTP Trainee (started in 2015)
Specialism: Cardiac Science
Manchester Metropolitan University
Background/Job role
Having worked in the NHS as an Assistant Technical Officer at the Royal Liverpool University Hospital, I moved to Manchester Metropolitan University to complete my degree.  Since joining the NHS at seventeen I have been amazed by the work physiologists do on a daily basis and have aimed to become one ever since.  I’m looking forward to completing my degree in Cardiac Physiology and hopefully continue my career onto the STP programme.

I am passionate about the career I have chosen, and look forward to being able to represent the views of the North West HCS Trainee Network Board and to air the interests of the PTP healthcare students of the North West.

JamesJames Orde-Powlett
james.m.orde-powlett@stu.mmu.ac.uk
PTP Trainee (started 2015)
Specialism: Neurophysiology
Manchester Metropolitan University
Background
I have always been interested in roles which provide a positive impact on the people around me.  From working as a Personal Trainer helping people meet their personal goals to volunteer Event First Aid with the Red Cross.  Eventually I decided that I wanted to work in the clinical environment experiencing both greater challenges and having a greater impact.  With the help of sponsorship from NHS Wales I enrolled at Manchester Metropolitan University and began my training as a Clinical Neurophysiologist. 
Job role

Clinical Neurophysiologists perform tests on the function of the brain and nervous system to aid in diagnosis or monitor ongoing conditions.

STP Members

Charlotte Charlotte Harborow
Charlotte.Harborow@rlbuht.nhs.uk
STP Trainee (started in 2015)
Specialism:  Clinical Biochemistry
The Royal Liverpool and Broadgreen University Hospitals
NHS Trust
Background
After graduating from the University of York with a BSc in Biochemistry, I joined the STP programme.   Although my undergraduate course had little content relating to chemical pathology, my final year research project involved looking for possible biomarkers to predict and monitor systemic disease in mice.  This introduction to blood sciences is what led to my interest in the Clinical Biochemistry STP.  Having been a course representative at university, I have always been interested in improving teaching and training for existing and future scientists and this is what attracted me to the North West HCS Trainee Network Board.
Job role
The role of a Clinical Scientist in Biochemistry is to ensure the laboratory provides a high quality service for both clinicians and patients.  This involves interpreting patient results from around 300 different tests, performing audits to identify areas for service improvement, developing existing methods and introducing new tests.  Working alongside doctors helps improve my clinical knowledge by applying what I have learned as part of the MSc to real-life cases.  Our department has always been involved with science outreach events and I have enjoyed being a part of this as I am keen to encourage young people to consider a career in science.

Idoia Gomez-ParamioIdoi
idoia.gomez-paramio@cmft.nhs.uk
STP Trainee (started 2015)  
Specialism: Clinical Bioinformatics (Genomics)
Central Manchester University Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust

 

Background
I studied Biological Sciences at the University of Heidelberg (Germany) and at the University of Salamanca (Spain), where I graduated in 2000.  After a 2-year long Post-Graduate specialisation in Biochemistry at the Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet in Munich and at the University of Salamanca I started a research project in Genetics that lead to a PhD in Genetics/Genomics.  Once completed, I gained further insight into genomics by working for 2 years at one the major New Generation Sequencing (NGS) equipment developers.  During the next 6 years, I worked for the University of Manchester in the field of clinical genetics; this experience taught me of the decisive role of NGS in early diagnosis of genetic disorders and how this was improving the patients’ and their family’s quality of life.  Aiming to contribute to this goal, I consolidated my knowledge in 2014 via an MSc in Bioinformatics at The University of Manchester.  By becoming a clinical scientist, I hope to be able to apply my knowledge, experience and skills to make a difference in patients’ life. 
Job role
Clinical bioinformatics working in genomics can be responsible for very different tasks depending on their laboratory needs, rendering difficult to provide a general role description.  In our Trust, we support the development of new diagnostic services to address current and plan for future needs.  We provide a daily diagnostic service by supporting geneticists in their task to identify efficiently and reliably disease-causing variants, work together with consultants, other clinical scientists and technicians in the design and optimisation of pipelines, are involved in clinical research and provide bespoke solutions to ongoing bioinformatics challenges.  

KentCannonKent Cannon
kentcannon46@gmail.com
STP Trainee (started in 2015)
Specialism: Cardiac Science
University Hospital of South Manchester NHS Foundation Trust
Background
Having graduated in 2013 with a BSc in Biomedical Science from Manchester Metropolitan University, I continued my education with a Masters in research from the University of Newcastle.  In 2014 I graduated with an MRes in Cardiovascular Science in Health and Disease, this being the subject I had enjoyed the most right from the beginning of A levels. The STP attracted me as not only an opportunity to apply the research background I had gained from my masters but also provided a large amount of patient contact which I favoured over a research laboratory based career.
Job role
My current role mainly involves becoming fluent in the fundamental aspect of Cardiac Science, ECGs.  This I am gaining through a large amount of patient contact through undertaking investigative techniques such as the 12 lead ECG, Ambulatory monitoring and assisting wherever possible in procedures such as exercise and stress echo tests.  I‘m really enjoying learning something new every day and I'm excited to get stuck in over the next few years.

SamanthaThornSamantha Thorn
Samantha.Thorn@uhsm.nhs.uk
STP Trainee (started in 2015)
Specialism: Cardiac Science 
University Hospital of South Manchester NHS Foundation Trust
Background
I had always been very keen to work in a clinical environment, and had a particular interest in the cardiovascular system.  After completing A levels in biology, chemistry and physical education, I chose to study Healthcare Science at Manchester Metropolitan University, specialising in Cardiac Physiology.
Job role
Since graduating, I have been working at the University Hospital of South Manchester NHS Foundation Trust and am now fully qualified to perform a range of diagnostic cardiac tests. My non-invasive role involves performing and interpreting electrocardiograms (ECGs), exercise tolerance tests, tilt tests, and 24 hour monitors.  I also work in a multidisciplinary team within the cardiac catheterisation laboratory during various invasive procedures including; angiograms, angioplasty, primary percutaneous coronary intervention and pacemaker implantation.  During these procedures I monitor the patient’s physiological changes, using ECG interpretation and blood pressure monitoring from inside the heart.

LeanneLeanne Evans
leanne.evans@rlbuht.nhs.uk
STP Trainee (started 2016) 
Specialism: Clinical Biochemistry
The Royal Liverpool and Broadgreen University Hospitals
NHS Trust 

Background
I graduated from the University of Liverpool with a BSc in Life Sciences Applicable to Medicine and although the course provided me with a good foundation of scientific knowledge and principles I had very limited experience in a laboratory setting.  I gained a job as a support technician in Biochemistry at the Royal Liverpool University Hospital to gain some much needed clinical laboratory bench experience.  It was during this time that I discovered the diverse roles of a Clinical Biochemist.  I was ultimately drawn to this profession after learning of the profound positive impact the work of Clinical Biochemists can have on the patient care pathway.  
Job role

Clinical Biochemists routinely aid with interpretation of results, offer advice to clinicians regarding patient management and suggest possible further testing which may be required in order to determine a diagnosis.  They ensure that high quality results are produced and laboratory services are of a good standard through regular undertaking of audits.

The role presents many opportunities to become involved in method development, an aspect I particularly enjoy.  This involves implementing new assays or improving those already in use to ensure the test repertoire offered by the laboratory adequately reflects the needs of the users.

 

thomas denton
Thomas Scott-Denton
Thomas.Scott-Denton@srft.nhs.uk
STP Trainee (started 2016)
Specialism: Clinical Pharmaceutical Science
Salford Royal NHS Foundation Trust
Background
I am originally from Cheshire and went on to study an MSci (Hons) in Medicinal and biological chemistry at the University of Nottingham.  My degree led on to roles in production of advanced therapeutics feedstock’s both GMP and research grade.  Before moving to pharmaceutical quality control.  I chose to join the STP programme in Clinical Pharmaceutical Science to use these skills to directly benefit patients.  I am the STP course representative forClinical Pharmaceutical Science for the September 2016 intake.
 
As with all NHS professionals I personally I have seen the differences of good and excellent care and aspire to give and deliver excellence.  However I know from experience the difficulties and challenges that come with getting a drug to the hands of a clinician; the trials and tribulations that precede and the problems that amount when this goes wrong.  It is the role of the Pharmacology professionals to provide detailed technical knowledge and maintain patient safety from laboratory to bedside solving the intervening problems, and assure excellence in pharmacological care.  I am proud to and hope to continue to contribute through my training and beyond in technical pharmaceutical service delivery in the NHS.  I am keen to see young people to consider a career in scientific services and pharmacology.
Job role
The role of clinical pharmaceutical scientists is in the management, production and procurement of pharmaceuticals to meet a patient specific need as an individual or a group of patients this practice is known and licensed as pharmaceutical specials manufacture in the UK.  We also take scientific information to clinicians, where relevant on pharmaceutical science.  Provide information on pharmaceutical risk and risk management.  Above all to enable the safe and effective production or procurement of pharmaceuticals I am often involved in preparing complex pharmaceutical products in a ready to use format for clinicians or patients.  At my home base (Salford Royal) I am part of a team that delivers an average of 1000 patient doses weekly of around 250 drug compounds.  As such I am involved with reviewing production and process management, audits and quality management.